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Colorado Kills Off Right To Work Efforts for Fourth Straight Year; Bogus Claims Of New Jobs Go Unheeded

| Apr 12, 2016 | Uncategorized

 

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by   Samuel Morris               Godwin Morris Laurenzi Bloomfield

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Colorado Kills Off Right To Work Efforts for Fourth Straight Year; Bogus Claims Of New Jobs Go Unheeded


Effort to turn Colorado into right-to-work state dies


Human-resources directors take note: Colorado is not becoming a right-to-work state this year.

Democrats on the state House State, Veterans and Military Affairs Committee voted along party lines Monday to kill a bill that would have turned Colorado into a right-to-work state where closed union shops are banned.

It is the fourth consecutive year that right-to-work legislation by Rep. Justin Everett, R-Littleton, has died in the same committee.

While Everett pitched Senate Bill 70 — which passed the Colorado Senate on a Republican-led party-line vote in February — as a pro-business bill, the only business organization that testified for it on Monday was the Rocky Mountain chapter of Associated Builders and Contractors.

Chapter president Mark Latimer noted that there is a national movement away from union states toward right-to-work laws that has left 26 states with similar statutes on their books and put Colorado at a competitive disadvantage, with every Mountain West state but New Mexico governed under a similar law.

“No one should be forced to join a union to keep or retain a job,” Latimer said.

But several union leaders argued that health benefits are lower and workplace death rates are significantly higher in right-to-work states.

And the chairwoman of the committee said that she did not want to upset the balance that has been struck in Colorado by the Labor Peace Act, which requires two elections and approval from 75 percent of workers before a work force can become a union shop.

“It was negotiated with many stakeholders at the table,” said Rep. Su Ryden, D-Aurora, of the 1943 law that set Colorado apart from all other states in terms of labor relations. “It seems to me it would be an abrupt change.”

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50 N. Front St., Memphis TN  38103

901 528 1702    901 949 1144

 

established yesterday – subscriptions good until tomorrow – published as news